Posts Tagged ‘FL’

Thomas Phinney Joins FontLab

Type Industry Veteran to take on VP job

Port Angeles, WA, May 1, 2014 — FontLab announced today that Thomas Phinney has joined the company as its Vice President. Mr. Phinney brings more than 15 years of experience in digital fonts, type design, product management and working with type designers to FontLab, where he will initially assume responsibility for customer relationships, evangelism and distribution for the company, as well as advising on product development and processes.

Phinney spent his last five years at Extensis as Senior Product Manager for Fonts and Typography, dealing with web fonts and font management solutions. Prior to that, he was at Adobe Systems from 1997 to 2008, ultimately as Product Manager for Fonts & Global Typography, where his work included evangelizing best practices for font creation and coordinating and evangelizing the OpenType font format standard. He is involved in the technical, design, historical, forensic and business aspects of fonts.

Phinney is also a board member of ATypI, the International Typography Association, a frequent speaker at font and typography conferences, and a regular contributor on fonts and typography to Communication Arts magazine. He has an MBA from UC Berkeley, and an MS in Graphic Arts Publishing, specializing in Design & Typography, from RIT.

“Thomas will be an invaluable addition to our team.” said Ted Harrison, President of FontLab. “His wide experience, extensive connections, effective management style, and depth of knowledge made him the best candidate for this job. We’re very happy to welcome him to Fontlab.”

About FontLab

For over 20 years, Fontlab Ltd., doing business as FontLab, has stayed at the forefront of digital font software by remaining devoted to developing advanced font editors and digital type products. Their full line of products is dedicated to solving the most complex digital type issues. These products include: BitFonter, FogLamp, FontLab Studio, Fontographer, ScanFont, TypeTool, TransType, FontFlasher, FONmaker, SigMaker and CompoCompiler. More information on all FontLab products can be seen at www.fontlab.com.

Brush Romans Webinar

with John Downer & Paul Herrera
March 11, 2014 11:00 CST

The majuscules of Imperial Rome have obviously survived the test of time. In ancient times, the structures of capital letters followed a formula. That formula will be introduced by means of a demonstration, using a flat brush. The flat brush is believed to have been the tool used by Romans for writing on vertical surfaces. By seeing what kinds of marks the flat brush can make, observers will get a better idea of how capital letters acquired their shapes.

Questions which will be answered:

1.  Can brush lettering be done without using a drafting table?
2.  How long will it take me to learn brush lettering well enough to make money at it?
3.  Have any of your former students become famous or successful?
4.  Where do you get your brushes and materials?
5.  Is it possible to run a profitable lettering business from home?

John Downer has been a journeyman sign painter for more than 40 years. He branched into the field of type design 30 years ago, and learned to use a Macintosh about 20 years after starting in the sign trade. His expertise in creating and critiquing letterforms is highly regarded. In addition, his best-known typefaces—Brothers, Roxy, Iowan Old Style and Vendetta—all have distinct structural elements which come directly from his knowledge  and practice of professional hand lettering.

Paul Herrera’s calligraphy and lettering training was done exclusively with Reverend E. M. Catich. Beginning as an undergraduate in 1967 and after a short interruption of military service, Paul worked as inscription cutter and calligraphy seminar assistant with Father Catich until the time of his death in 1979. At that point Paul was invited to teach Father Catich’s classes at St. Ambrose and would continue to do so until 1989. During that time Paul also served as a faculty member of five international calligraphy conventions. They include; “The Calligraphy Connection” held at St. John’s University in Minnesota 1981 and 1984, “The California Experience” held at Scripps College in Claremont, California 1985, “Innovations” held at Stevens Institute in Hoboken, New Jersey 1986, and “Calligraphy Northwest” held at the University of Portland, Oregon in 1987.

During his forty year career Paul has conducted numerous lettering seminars for calligraphy organizations throughout the Midwest and Canada. He continued inscription work for Wichita State University and an architectural firm in Chicago as well as individual clients. Additionally, he was watercolor and calligraphy instructor at the former Davenport Municipal Art Gallery from 1973 – 1984. He retired from civil service in January of 2009 and now works full time in his studio and offers workshops in calligraphy.

To join us for this interesting webinar please register here.

Font Licensing Webinar

November’s webinar will be a freebie. We’ve persuaded Jim Kidwell of Extensis to expand on the talk he recently gave at TypeCon: “The Evolution of Font Licensing Comprehension in the Creative Community”. In this webinar  (Tuesday, 12 November at 11:00PST) Jim will get into the heads of font licensees and see what they really want. Fortunately he has some very interesting data from a survey on this topic that Extensis did of its users.

Whether you’re a font maker or a font user you’ll want to hear about

  • what font EULA’s could and should do for you.
  • how web fonts are changing the game.
  • how the typographic community can engage the rest of the creative community in the licensing discussion

Jim will share his analysis of the survey results and his own experiences and opinions. You can chime in with your own questions and observations as well.

As a writer, speaker and general software nerd, Jim Kidwell evangelizes the effective integration of fonts in creative workflows. Jim has shared his unique perspective with audiences at SXSW, Future of Web Design, WebVisions and more.

The Evolution of Font Licensing Comprehension in the Creative Community
No payment, just

 Click here to register for the Webinar
12 Nov 2013, 1100PST/2pm EST/2000CEST

ATypI Wraps Up with Some Excellent Typography Talks

Those who left early on Sunday (not too many judging from how full the ballroom is) missed some excellent presentations on the modern use of type – i.e. typography rather than type design. John Berry, Mark Barratt, Claus Eggers, and Nick Sherman gave us some very interesting insights about the design of books, websites and “content” in general on the plethora of electronic devices available now and in the future.
A few tidbits;
– URLs as a substitute for page numbering
– rollover flyouts for marginalia
– Scripta, The Typographic Institute (John’s new project: www.typoinstitute.org)
– the conversational document
– dynamic type format

I believe all the talks were recorded and I heard some mention in the board meeting of getting these recordings (and others from previous meetings) into a form and place where they will be accessible to members. Let’s hope it happens.

Color fonts. Overview of the proposals for color extensions of the OpenType font format.

Although Fontlab Ltd. debuted the Photofont technology some 8 years ago, the typographic community did not show much interest for multi-color fonts or typography. In 2013, it changed. Actually, this started a few years ago with Apple introducing the color emoji font into iOS, and then Mac OS X 10.7. Now, all major industry players (Apple, Adobe, Mozilla, Google and Microsoft) have proposed their formats, which aim to extend the OpenType font format by the ability of including color glyph information. The proposals differ in many aspects. Below is a discussion of the proposals along with some personal comments.

This article is very technical. No completeness or correctness of the information presented below, and all views are personal.


The video tutorial by Adam Twardoch accompanies this article by providing a more practical take on color font creation issues.