Posts Tagged ‘Fontographer’

FontLab Studio 5, Fontographer 5 and TypeTool 3 on macOS 10.15 Catalina

[Edit: Updated on December 5, 2019 with info about FontLab 7 and about Crossover 19]
Apple released macOS 10.15 Catalina on October 7, 2019. This version of macOS only runs apps that are 64-bit, and removes the ability to run 32-bit Mac apps. This means that you cannot natively run our classic font apps on macOS Catalina: FontLab Studio 5, Fontographer 5, TypeTool 3. In this blog post, we’re discussing options that you have if you’d like to use Catalina. (Please check this blog post in a few days, we may have added some content by then.)

FontLab Studio 5, Fontographer 5, TypeTool 3 on macOS Catalina — important news

Fix Fonts Fast for Half Off

OTMaster: 50% Off Summer Sale

From now until the end of August September 21, the incredibly powerful and useful OTMaster 3.7 font editing tool from our friends at Dutch Type Library and URW++ is 50% off! For even more savings, you can save 25% on Fontographer 5 in a bundle with OT Master at half off!

DTL OTMaster is a technical font viewer and editor that allows in-depth examination and fine low-level tuning of any OpenType font, TrueType font or TrueType Collection. Because of its non-invasive nature, DTL OTMaster allows type designers and font developers to make small modifications to specific parts of an .otf, .ttf or .ttc font without changing other aspects of the font. It can also serve as an excellent font testing tool. Professional font users benefit from OTMaster’s ability to examine the fonts’ inner structures, and to fix some common technical problems. Software vendors and developers will find DTL OTMaster an indispensable tool that will aid their globalization and internationalization efforts.

Fontographer 5.2 is our font editor for designers, easier than ever to use, but with industrial-strength FontLab technology under the hood.

Both OTMaster and Fontographer are available on both Mac OS X and Windows.

Advanced FontLab Studio webinar with David Bergsland

David Bergsland’s first webinar on troubleshooting font creation in FontLab Studio got a standing ovation from the attendees! David’s no-nonsense designer-friendly approach is accessible to all. Now he is following it up with “Advanced Font Creation,” Tuesday June 10 at 9:00 am Pacific / noon Eastern / 18:00 CESTRegister now!

As Jim Gallagher, our tech support and instructional guru says, “Most designers won’t give these kind of tips away, but Dave spills the beans! You will wonder why you never saw some of these things before.”

Attendance at David’s previous webinar is not at all a pre-requisite for this follow-up with even more information and ideas about how to make font creation easy. However, you can still register for that previous webinar even now, after the fact, and watch the recording.

There will be a live Q&A session at the end of the webinar, when you can ask David about the things that puzzle you!

David Bergsland has been a type designer for 20 years, and is the author of both Fontographer and FontLab Studio editions of Practical Font Design. Read more about him.

There are a limited number of seats available for this webinar, so don’t be disappointed—register now!

FontLab survey font editor prize-winners

Soberana typeface sample

Soberana typeface sample

Thank you to all of you who took our latest survey — over 650 of you! We have been crunching numbers and reading your comments and feedback religiously.

We gave away three big prizes via random drawings!

Our First Prize winner is Dimitri Fontaine of Graphic Identité in Nantes, France. They are a design agency specializing in identity, branding and packaging, as well as industrial design — and yes, that really is his last name. They use Fontographer, more to modify, improve and complete existing fonts than design entirely new ones. They will use the prize to get an additional license for Fontographer, including future upgrades.

Our Second Prize winner is Iván Moreno of México. Ivan already uses FontLab Studio, so he is going to save his prize to use to upgrade to version 6 when it comes out. He looks forward to produce commercial and professional fonts for custom and retail use when he finishes his Master’s degree in type design from Centro de Estudios Gestalt, Veracruz, México (Maestría en Diseño Tipográfico), and says this prize is “just what he needed.”

Our Twitter Prize (for somebody who tweeted about the survey) goes to Cristóbal Henestrosa of Estudio CH, also in Mexico. Cristóbal is a graphic designer and an established type designer, having been recognized in the TDC competitions in 2008 and 2010. His last typeface was Soberana, a custom typeface for use throughout the Mexican government, created in collaboration with Raúl Plancarte, using FontLab Studio. He will also use his prize for a future upgrade.

Although we didn’t get to 1000 responses to trigger the grand prize, we were happy to see so many responses. Thanks again to everyone who participated and gave us useful feedback!

Thomas Phinney Joins FontLab

Type Industry Veteran to take on VP job

Port Angeles, WA, May 1, 2014 — FontLab announced today that Thomas Phinney has joined the company as its Vice President. Mr. Phinney brings more than 15 years of experience in digital fonts, type design, product management and working with type designers to FontLab, where he will initially assume responsibility for customer relationships, evangelism and distribution for the company, as well as advising on product development and processes.

Phinney spent his last five years at Extensis as Senior Product Manager for Fonts and Typography, dealing with web fonts and font management solutions. Prior to that, he was at Adobe Systems from 1997 to 2008, ultimately as Product Manager for Fonts & Global Typography, where his work included evangelizing best practices for font creation and coordinating and evangelizing the OpenType font format standard. He is involved in the technical, design, historical, forensic and business aspects of fonts.

Phinney is also a board member of ATypI, the International Typography Association, a frequent speaker at font and typography conferences, and a regular contributor on fonts and typography to Communication Arts magazine. He has an MBA from UC Berkeley, and an MS in Graphic Arts Publishing, specializing in Design & Typography, from RIT.

Thomas will be an invaluable addition to our team.” said Ted Harrison, President of FontLab. “His wide experience, extensive connections, effective management style, and depth of knowledge made him the best candidate for this job. We’re very happy to welcome him to Fontlab.”

About FontLab

For over 20 years, Fontlab Ltd., doing business as FontLab, has stayed at the forefront of digital font software by remaining devoted to developing advanced font editors and digital type products. Their full line of products is dedicated to solving the most complex digital type issues. These products include: BitFonter, FogLamp, FontLab Studio, Fontographer, ScanFont, TypeTool, TransType, FontFlasher, FONmaker, SigMaker and CompoCompiler. More information on all FontLab products can be seen at www​.fontlab​.com.

All Fontlab Products OK with Mac OS X 10.9 Mavericks

All current FontLab products have been tested with Mac OS10.9 (Mavericks). No problems were discovered by our staff, and there have been no reports of problems from any of our customers.

Specifically, the following “Mac Intel” products are fully compatible with Mac OS10.9 Mavericks:

  • FontLab Studio 5.1.4
  • Fontographer 5.2.3
  • TypeTool 3.1.2
  • TransType 4.0.0

If you’re using an older version, we recommend updating or upgrading it.

The following products work properly in Mavericks when using the “Lion Compatibility Pack” edition of the product:

  • BitFonter 3
  • ScanFont 5

Other products and older versions of the products listed above are not or may not be compatible.

Glyphtext and webinar apology

After we published the recording of our first webinar, David Vereschagin contacted us with the following comment:

Jimmy Gallagher commits a serious Fontlab error when attempting to demonstrate letterspacing and setting sidebearings in his “Beyond the Basics: Font Editing Tips and Techniques” webinar. (This starts at about the 50 minute mark in the recording.) He fails to remember that putting /H into the metrics window in Fontlab will not yield a display of a slash and an H, but simply an H itself. When he inputs H/H/H he thinks he is showing how his spacing system works, but is only showing a series of Hs. Worse, when trying to show the letterspacing of HOH he claims that the sidebearings on O are the source of the letterspacing problem, when it’s clearly the left sidebearing of the H that is off. Everyone who attended that webinar or purchased the recording is owed an apology and a correction.

Thanks! I certainly do apologize for the confusion. Using the slash glyph as a “spacer glyph” was possible in Fontographer 5.0 and earlier, but you won’t get away with that so easily in FontLab Studio or the newest Fontographer 5.2. Rushing to finish and trying to toggle between FontLab Studio and Fontographer tripped me up. Thanks so much for catching this — we can always use comments like this so that we can do better next time!

And here’s what happened in more detail…

FontLab hinting webinar sells out in three hours

Yes, it took only about 170 minutes from the time the announcement hit the web to fill all 23 of the available slots in Monika Bartels’ upcoming Fontlab tutorial webinar on hinting (“Hinting: The Design After the Design” on Tuesday, October 8, 11:00 AM). Who knew there was such a thirst for this arcane knowledge?

Certainly not us. We figured we might have trouble getting a couple dozen interested people together.

Of course we had a hint (pun intended). Just a week or so earlier Jimmy’s “Beyond the Basics: Font Editing Tips and Techniques” webinar had sold out in 9 hours. We sense a pattern.

So in view of the obvious demand we’re going to increase the available seats (retroactively even!) at our webinars. We were limited to 25 (but had to save a couple spots for the host and/or presenter), but now we’ve upped it to 200.

That means that if you tried to register for the hinting webinar but were told it was already full, or had problems with registration and it didn’t “take”, then you now have a “Get out of jail free” card. Just go back to the registration URL (http://​www​.anymeeting​.com/​P​I​I​D​=​E​958​D​688864638) and sign up and it should let you in with no problems. As long as we stay under 200 people 🙂

This even applies to people who wanted to get into Jimmy’s first webinar (“Beyond the Basics — Font Editing Tips & Techniques” on Tuesday, September 17). Of course you can’t go back in time and participate, but we did make a recording. Until today you couldn’t view the recording because it was limited to only the original participants. But our new 200 limit now applies to that recording as well, so you can go back to the original registration URL (http://​www​.anymeeting​.com/​P​I​I​D​=​E​958​D​980844​F3D) for that webinar and sign up and you’ll get to see Jimmy explain all about the optical illusions of type design and a bunch of other neat stuff.

Just about an hour ago I sent out the invitations for Jimmy’s next webinar, “Son of Beyond Basics”. In this sequel der Fontmeister will go a bit further into the mysteries of type design and reveal even more tips and techniques — and answer questions. It will probably be about half new stuff and half a recapitulation of the most important points from the first Beyond Basics webinar. The registration URL is http://​www​.anymeeting​.com/​P​I​I​D​=​E​958​D​688854​F3D

One caveat about registering: AnyMeeting (the webinar system) seems to have a little problem with some browsers — especially if popup blocking is enabled. So if you’re using Chrome or Safari it would be a good idea to turn off the popup blocker. And if that doesn’t work then try Firefox or Internet Explorer.

On fractional coordinates

Theoretically, OpenType PS (.otf) supports fractional coordinates, but there are some technical caveats associated with it. In principle, we could say that the final font formats only support integer coordinates but during the work process, having fractional coordinates would be helpful.

For example, if you have drawn your glyphs on an integer grid, but then you’d like to make some adjustments such as: make it slightly more narrow, then slightly wider, then perhaps slant it by a few degrees and then slant it back, or make some tiny rotations, or maybe scale the glyph down and then up again — on an integer grid, the result will have accumulated the rounding errors from every one of these operations. On a fractional grid, all your shapes (the positions of the BCPs, the angles, the stem thicknesses etc.) will always remain just as in the original design.

Therefore, a hardwired integer grid such as the one in FontLab Studio does impose a certain limitation onto the type designer. A fractional grid such as the one in Fontographer allows you to avoid those rounding errors. But of course, at the very end, when you decide to generate or ship the font, you’ll need to align your points to an integer grid, or the software will do this for you.