Posts Tagged ‘Indic’

SRO at TypoDay 2014

Typography Day 2014 was so popular that the organizers had to cut off registration when they reached 600. The venue, Symbiosis Institute of Design in Pune, India, just couldn’t accommodate any more people than that. And the popularity was quite justified too, as we just finished three great days of workshops and presentations which were packed with type aficionados from all over India and the world.
Fontlab did a “Type Design 101” workshop on the first day of the conference (as we have done at previous TypoDays) which was also sold out. On Sunday we presented our paper on research into the unique aspects of Indic type design and today (Monday) we’re kicking off a three day workshop on Advanced FontLab Studio.
AurobindPatelAward
The highlight of the final day of the conference was the Lifetime Achievement Award given to Aurobind Patel.

ATypI Attendance Hits 400

Greetings from Amsterdam! The annual ATypI conference kicked off here yesterday with near record attendance. We haven’t seen a crowd this size since the early 00s.
Day 1 had three tracks – one on non-Latin type and another on technology – and an all-day workshop on Indic type design. Unfortunately I didn’t arrive until the afternoon, but by that time the meeting rooms were full and the vibes were good. In the latter part of the afternoon Frank Griesshammer explained new changes in the Adobe kern feature and a bunch of neat scripts for font manipulation; Adam demonstrated colour fonts and their use in overlays using the new version 4 of TransType; and David Lemon and Werner Lemberg talked about the ongoing development of the Postscript rasterizer for mobile platforms.
In the evening we gathered in the Aula, Oude Lutherse Kerk, a beautiful historic church a few blocks away from the hotel, for some short presentations about interesting items from the EYE archives.

Day two also had three tracks: science, history/education, and workshops/meetings. The science track was mostly about legibility research. Albert Jan-Pool talked about the new DIN 1450 signage standard just out in April. It seems that the new gold standard for height reference in legibility research is visual angle of the x-height. No more fussing around with point sizes and the like. If you look at signage from this point of view the glyphs are actually smaller than much fine print. Takeaway: they have to be optically scaled to be more legible, just like other small print.
Continuing with the theme, Ann Bessemans told us about her development of Matilda, a font for children with poor vision. Significant finding: kids with visual impairment read fonts better if they have slightly more heterogeneity of rhythm than normal. The opposite of normally sighted children.
Sofie Beier and Mary Dyson showed their legibility research technique called RSVP, which they used with a new font called neutral test designed by Sofie to determine whether and which font design changes resulted in better legibility (Bold is worst). Sofie has even written a book on the subject, “Designing for Legibility”.
Nadine Chahine presented similar legibility research on Arabic Naskh script and came to the conclusion that increasingly complex (and beautiful) scripts actually decrease legibility.

At the end of the day we all adjourned back to the Oude Lutherse Kerk to hear Alice Rawsthorn give a great talk on where design meets life. Pithy quote: “Design can empower, or disempower, us in every aspect of our lives.” TDC then awarded Gerrit Noordzij their medal (to standing ovations) and finally it was off to the Bijzondere Collections for drinks and the opening reception.

OpenType Layout feature classification

OpenType Layout features allow for orthographically correct display of complex scripts such as Arabic and Indic and provide a mechanism for the user to apply advanced typographic formatting to text. They are used in the SFNT GSUB and GPOS tables.

This document contains a useful classification of OpenType Layout feature tags. It is based on the OpenType spec version 1.6, with some additional entries about removed features and Microsoft-only Math features related to the MATH OpenType table.

This document is very technical in nature, and is primarily aimed at software developers who wish to implement user interfaces for applying OpenType Layout features in applications. 

Color fonts. Overview of the proposals for color extensions of the OpenType font format.

Although Fontlab Ltd. debuted the Photofont technology some 8 years ago, the typographic community did not show much interest for multi-color fonts or typography. In 2013, it changed. Actually, this started a few years ago with Apple introducing the color emoji font into iOS, and then Mac OS X 10.7. Now, all major industry players (Apple, Adobe, Mozilla, Google and Microsoft) have proposed their formats, which aim to extend the OpenType font format by the ability of including color glyph information. The proposals differ in many aspects. Below is a discussion of the proposals along with some personal comments.

This article is very technical. No completeness or correctness of the information presented below, and all views are personal.


The video tutorial by Adam Twardoch accompanies this article by providing a more practical take on color font creation issues.