Posts Tagged ‘OK’

Preview new FontLab website

We’ve been working hard on a brand new web site for FontLab and its software, and would love your feedback on the work in progress. Your opinion matters to us, whether you are our customers or our colleagues.

Right now it is still a preview: the main page and the TransType app page are the two that are more-or-less done, and we have folks working on the rest of it. We hope you’ll agree that these are a much-needed makeover and give us a modern look.

Check out the new design!

Size-specific Adjustments to Type Designs, 2nd edition

Until June 29, Tim Ahrens is offering a pre-publication discount on the brand-new and much expanded/revised second edition of his book, Size-specific Adjustments to Type Designs.

This is not just the best, but really the only significant work on this intriguing and complex topic. Highly recommended for intermediate and advanced type designers, and anyone else interested!

Read more (and buy) on Tim’s blog.

FontLab survey font editor prize-winners

Soberana typeface sample

Soberana typeface sample

Thank you to all of you who took our latest survey—over 650 of you! We have been crunching numbers and reading your comments and feedback religiously.

We gave away three big prizes via random drawings!

Our First Prize winner is Dimitri Fontaine of Graphic Identité in Nantes, France. They are a design agency specializing in identity, branding and packaging, as well as industrial design—and yes, that really is his last name. They use Fontographer, more to modify, improve and complete existing fonts than design entirely new ones. They will use the prize to get an additional license for Fontographer, including future upgrades.

Our Second Prize winner is Iván Moreno of México. Ivan already uses FontLab Studio, so he is going to save his prize to use to upgrade to version 6 when it comes out. He looks forward to produce commercial and professional fonts for custom and retail use when he finishes his Master’s degree in type design from Centro de Estudios Gestalt, Veracruz, México (Maestría en Diseño Tipográfico), and says this prize is “just what he needed.”

Our Twitter Prize (for somebody who tweeted about the survey) goes to Cristóbal Henestrosa of Estudio CH, also in Mexico. Cristóbal is a graphic designer and an established type designer, having been recognized in the TDC competitions in 2008 and 2010. His last typeface was Soberana, a custom typeface for use throughout the Mexican government, created in collaboration with Raúl Plancarte, using FontLab Studio. He will also use his prize for a future upgrade.

Although we didn’t get to 1000 responses to trigger the grand prize, we were happy to see so many responses. Thanks again to everyone who participated and gave us useful feedback!

Brush Romans Webinar

with John Downer & Paul Herrera
March 11, 2014 11:00 CST

The majuscules of Imperial Rome have obviously survived the test of time. In ancient times, the structures of capital letters followed a formula. That formula will be introduced by means of a demonstration, using a flat brush. The flat brush is believed to have been the tool used by Romans for writing on vertical surfaces. By seeing what kinds of marks the flat brush can make, observers will get a better idea of how capital letters acquired their shapes.

Questions which will be answered:

1.  Can brush lettering be done without using a drafting table?
2.  How long will it take me to learn brush lettering well enough to make money at it?
3.  Have any of your former students become famous or successful?
4.  Where do you get your brushes and materials?
5.  Is it possible to run a profitable lettering business from home?

John Downer has been a journeyman sign painter for more than 40 years. He branched into the field of type design 30 years ago, and learned to use a Macintosh about 20 years after starting in the sign trade. His expertise in creating and critiquing letterforms is highly regarded. In addition, his best-known typefaces—Brothers, Roxy, Iowan Old Style and Vendetta—all have distinct structural elements which come directly from his knowledge  and practice of professional hand lettering.

Paul Herrera’s calligraphy and lettering training was done exclusively with Reverend E. M. Catich. Beginning as an undergraduate in 1967 and after a short interruption of military service, Paul worked as inscription cutter and calligraphy seminar assistant with Father Catich until the time of his death in 1979. At that point Paul was invited to teach Father Catich’s classes at St. Ambrose and would continue to do so until 1989. During that time Paul also served as a faculty member of five international calligraphy conventions. They include; “The Calligraphy Connection” held at St. John’s University in Minnesota 1981 and 1984, “The California Experience” held at Scripps College in Claremont, California 1985, “Innovations” held at Stevens Institute in Hoboken, New Jersey 1986, and “Calligraphy Northwest” held at the University of Portland, Oregon in 1987.

During his forty year career Paul has conducted numerous lettering seminars for calligraphy organizations throughout the Midwest and Canada. He continued inscription work for Wichita State University and an architectural firm in Chicago as well as individual clients. Additionally, he was watercolor and calligraphy instructor at the former Davenport Municipal Art Gallery from 1973 – 1984. He retired from civil service in January of 2009 and now works full time in his studio and offers workshops in calligraphy.

To join us for this interesting webinar please register here.

Matthew Carter Interview Webinar

Matthew Carter is arguably the foremost living type designer of our time. He has an extensive background in typography, working with some of the great designers in our field. Matthew has been part of the transformation of the industry since the days of metal type.

He has worked for many foundries, including Linotype, and was the founder of the Bitstream font foundry. He has designed many of the fonts that we use every day, including Bell Centennial used in our phone books. He is the creator of Verdana, Snell Roundhand, and Carter Sans as well as many adaptations of fonts such as Galliard, Bodoni, etc.

Matthew will be doing an interview and answering questions during this webinar. But we are limited to 200 attendees – so register ASAP! If you don’t make it into the webinar there will be an online recording you can register for later.

Here is the link to register for the free February 25th, 11:00 am CST webinar:

Click here to register for the webinar on anymeeting.com

Dave Bergsland Gets a Virtual Standing Ovation!

Jimmy (Der Fontmeister) raves:

Yesterday morning we had a spectacular webinar with David Bergsland (Author of Practical Font Design – link: http://www.fontlab.com/typographic-resources/font-typography-books/)

I gotta say, after many years of handling font tech questions, I’ve never seen anything like what Dave does. I am grateful to the many genius designers I’ve learned from but nobody has ever blown my mind like this guy did.

He nonchalantly shared some tips about using the font blue zones and font mask to overlay his parts library on top of the glyphs as he develops them. Suddenly, problems stand out like a sore thumb! Hinting and optical illusion issues are avoided, etc. etc. I COULD go on –suffice it to say the audience gave him a standing ovation via the chat window!!!

This is a MUST SEE… In case you missed it here’s the registration link to watch the recorded version:
https://www.anymeeting.com/AccountManager/RegEv.aspx?PIID=E959DB85804D31

If you’ve already registered you can view the recording at:
http://www.anymeeting.com/hfoic/EF50D6888046

From Concept to Completion Webinar

Joe Treacy will give our December webinar “The Fevered Brow of a Type Designer: Font Design from Concept to Completion”. In this webinar  (Tuesday, 3 December at 11:00CST) Joe will take us through the steps of designing a font from beginning to end. He will describe the tasks of creating glyphs and building a typeface from a parts library. He’ll share his unique approach to setting the metrics for a font and make some suggestions on the final product target in various font formats.
If you ever wanted to get the benefit of experience (without actually having to go through the experience) this is your opportunity to look over the shoulder of a seasoned pro and see how the total font design process works. Joe’s presentation will give you the inside scoop on what it’s really like to prepare a commercial font from scratch.
There is a small fee (US$24.99) for this webinar and we are limited in the number of places, so sign up early by clicking here.

Joe Treacy is President & Director of Typography and founder of Treacyfaces, Inc. having designed and sold original and innovative fonts globally since 1978, and online continuously since 1993.
Treacy has designed hundreds of typefaces sold to thousands of firms globally. He was a recipient of Typefaces of the Year Award alongside Adobe in 1990, in addition to receiving prestigious gold and Effie awards for his advertising communications work.
Joe’s work in design and typography has been featured in The New York Times. He lectures regularly on electronic publishing, quality typography and design. He’s written articles on type and design trends for major magazines such as HOW, I-D Industrial Design, Verbum and Personal Publishing.

From Concept to Completion

  Click here to register for the Webinar
3 Dec 2013, 1100CST/2pm EST/2000CEST

Color fonts. Overview of the proposals for color extensions of the OpenType font format.

Although Fontlab Ltd. debuted the Photofont technology some 8 years ago, the typographic community did not show much interest for multi-color fonts or typography. In 2013, it changed. Actually, this started a few years ago with Apple introducing the color emoji font into iOS, and then Mac OS X 10.7. Now, all major industry players (Apple, Adobe, Mozilla, Google and Microsoft) have proposed their formats, which aim to extend the OpenType font format by the ability of including color glyph information. The proposals differ in many aspects. Below is a discussion of the proposals along with some personal comments.

This article is very technical. No completeness or correctness of the information presented below, and all views are personal.


The video tutorial by Adam Twardoch accompanies this article by providing a more practical take on color font creation issues.